“When we said Lillian is cutting “Romola,” we meant it” (Screenland – 1924)

Screenland – December 1924

Behind The Screen

“When we said Lillian is cutting “Romola,” we meant it”

Lillian Gish was much surprised the other day to discover that she had gone to France at the request of composer Charpentier (no relation to Georges) to appear in a silent screen version of his celebrated opera, “Louise;” she had gone to Germany to appear in a continental company’s production of “Faust,” as Marguerite; she had signed with Famous Players to take Elsie Ferguson’s place in the title role of the filmization of Molnar’s play, “The Swan;” she had made a new contract to star in a series of pictures for Metro-Goldwyn.

Lillian Gish and William Powell - Romola
Lillian Gish and William Powell – Romola

Lillian was surprised because she was the last to hear about these reported activities. None of them is true. As a matter of cold, hard, businesslike fact, Miss Gish is just at present completing the editing and cutting of “Romola,” the picture which she and her sister Dorothy made in Italy, and wondering what she is going to do next. Her managers have not yet decided and meanwhile the Gishes are keeping their well-known eyes open for new stories.

Lillian Gish and director Henry King - Romola candid on set

By the way, when we said Lillian is cutting “Romola,” we meant it. Many stars superficially supervise their productions. But we met Lillian the other day coming out of a stuffy little projection room where she had been viewing thousands of feet of film herself, and giving directions as to the actual cutting. Her long career as a Griffith heroine gave her valuable experience along these lines, for D. W. always called his leading lady in to watch the “rushes” and to give him advice as to what bit should stay in and what sequence should be ruthlessly amputated.

In fact, Lillian is one of the few stars in pictures interested in something besides her own close-ups.

Romola Motion Picture Magazine Page Lillian Gish
Romola Motion Picture Magazine Page Lillian Gish

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