“The Greatest Thing In Life” advertising campaign (Paramount and Artcraft Press Books – Dec 1918)

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918)

Accessories For The Exploitation Of “The Greatest Thing In Life”

Tell ‘Em About It.

LILLIAN GISH and Robert Harron were big characters in “The Great Love.”

Don’t forget to let your public know that they are playing together again in “The Greatest Thing in Life.” What they did in “The Great Love” set a high standard for them to follow in any subsequent play in which they might appear together. But they’ve reached that high standard, and passed beyond it. Tell your people about it. They’ll want to know and to see the picture.

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 2
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 2

HAVING passed through the cauldron of war, the haughty clubman, with his petty prejudices and jealousies burned away, wooed the little cigar counter girl like a real man. War is a great leveler and develops the greatest thing in life.

WHAT is caste to those who have endured a common sorrow, who have suffered a common peril? War has broken many a shell of social precedent, but never a stranger mating was caused than that of Jeanette Peret and Edward Livingston in “The Greatest Thing In Life.”

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 3
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 3

Death for the Huns who were beating down the door.

Life for the American girl, trapped behind it.

And for the American boy who led the Yanks, the one who threw the grenade, the greatest thing in life.

What is the greatest thing in life? Victory? The veteran’s first view of the Statue of Liberty after the end of the war? Or—just what is it? D. W. Griffith will show you in the newest production from the hand of the genius who made “The Birth of a Nation,” “Intolerance,” “Hearts of the World” and “The Great Love.”

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 4
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 4

Lillian Gish and Robert Harron are in it. WHAT would you ask for if the gods decreed that the one thing you wanted you could have? You’d want the greatest thing in life, wouldn’t you?

Well, what is the greatest thing in life? Victory? Money? Love? The Distinguished Service Cross? The Sight of home at the end of the war? Or is it—the glorious thing that an unenvied American youth found in France in the midst of battle, the thing that brought him all that’s really worth while? Is it that?

D. W. Griffith has that answer for you in his newest production. Lillian Gish and Robert Harron are in it and the great creator of “The Birth of a Nation,” “Intolerance,” “Hearts of the World” and “The Great Love” with his magic has woven around them a motion picture story that takes its fit place among the photoplay masterpieces that will live forever. What do you know about that French girl that your soldier-boy, back victorious from the war, is going to tell you about ? Are her clothes startling? Do the skirts show her hose? Is she the “Frenchy” sort of person you imagine her to be? D. W. Griffith’s newest motion picture introduces you.

Lillian Gish portrays the girl. Her two love affairs don’t go quite smoothly. Garlic fumes bathe one of her idols and the other is scarred with a sneer for all mankind. But a war well-won makes a tremendous difference ! There are worse things than garlic, and cads can change.

motion picture lobby card for the greatest thing in life cve detail2 (library of congress)

Meet that girl your boy knows in France.

THRILLING SCENES IN LILLIAN GISH’S NEW WAR PICTURE

Superb Griffith-Artcraft Picture

“The Greatest Thing In Life.”

ONE of the most remarkable scenes that has thus far been shown on the screen, is in D. W. Griffith’s new Artcraft photoplay, “The Greatest Thing In Life,” with Lillian Gish in the stellar part which will be shown at the theatre next The war has swept over a French village in which a young French-American girl, Jeanette Peret, the character portrayed by Lillian Gish, is living with her father. Hammered by the death storm from the great guns, they have taken refuge in an underground dugout. As the French are leaving, pressed back temporarily by the Huns, a French officer shows Jeanette’s father how the water jar opens with a secret spring and discloses a telephone. “When the Huns come,” the lieutenant tells the old man, “You can serve France by using it.” The old man tries his best to send the message but he is wounded and his daughter undertakes to send it. With the Huns pounding at the door, killing and slaughtering as they come, the girl takes up the field telephone. At first no one will answer. At last, when it seems as though her heart must burst, a voice comes at the other end of the telephone. It is the voice of the fastidious, dandified young lover from America whom she had flouted. That faroff “hello” heard through shot and shell, means more to her than the hope of rescue from the beasts who are beating down her door ; it means that the man she loves has found his soul in the muck and glug of the trenches New honors await Miss Gish when this vivid and wonderful emotional scene is presented to the public. She is splendidly supported, her leading man being Robert Harron, an actor of ability and wide popularity.

Lillian Gish - The Greatest Thing in Life
The Greatest Thing in Life

LILLIAN GISH HAS CHARMING ROLE IN BIG GRIFFITH FILM

Paramount Star Rollicking Girl

in “The Greatest Thing In Life.”

TO see Miss Lillian Gish as Jeanette in “The Greatest Thing in Life,” is to see her in a role entirely different from any in which she has recently appeared. The picture is an Artcraft production by David Wark Griffith and will be shown at the theatre next It presents Miss Gish as a rollicking girl, half hoyden, half dreamer. Her old father, who is homesick for his native France, keeps a little tobacco and news-stand in New York City. Jeanette has to tidy up the living rooms, and attend customers. Very happy is she with today, but tomorrow is of great interest, too, for then will come her hero, a strong, brave man who loves the world as she does, and likes to dream too. At first she thought Edward Livingston might be the man. He was an elegant New York chap, but he called her a simp one day, and left before she could really express her thoughts with the rigorous force they deserved. Then she went to France with her Daddy. When a young giant with a basket of vegetables arrived for the daily delivery at her Aunt’s shop, and found the American girl wonderful, Jeanette had a new hero to consider. But he would eat garlic, and Cupid never rode to conquest on the waves of garlic fumes. Livingston visited France, crossing the ocean to deliver an apology. He shared her delight in poetry and he was clean and fine, but he hated children. She knew then he could never be her ideal, and she returned to Mon. le Bebe. Then war changed many things for little Jeanette. It changed Livingston too. And in the end she knew Livingston was her ideal.

Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising - posters
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising – posters
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 7
Paramount and Artcraft Press Books (Dec 1918) Greatest Thing in Life advertising 7

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