Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) Entire Documentary

Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016)

Very few people know that Hollywood was largely dominated by women as filmmakers in the 1910s and 20s, there were more women producers and directors in powerful positions before 1920 than at any other time in the motion picture history. Their names were Lois Weber, Mary Pickford, Frances Marion, Alice Guy Blaché, Dorothy Arzner etc … Before the Big Crash women were creatively working in Hollywood at all levels. Unbelievable as it may seem, it took until 2010 for a woman – Kathryn Bigelow – to receive an Oscar for Best Director! Casting in the documentary includes the most successful women to date, Paula Wagner, producer and business partner of Tom Cruise, Robin Swicord, screenwriter and Lynda Obst, producer of, amongst others, Sleepless in Seattle, Contact and Flashdance. And Lillian Gish and Sherry Lansing (archives)

1920

American actress Lillian Gish (1893-1993) makes her only foray into directing with Remodeling Her Husband. In an “all-woman” production, Gish co-writes the screenplay with her sister Dorothy, who also stars, and recruits the American writer Dorothy Parker to write the intertitles.

In 1919 Lillian Gish was one of Hollywood’s most respected performers and D. W. Griffith’s favorite actress. That year, confident that her knowledge of the movies was equal to his own, Griffith asked her to direct a movie starring her sister Dorothy for Paramount. Convinced that women had already proven to be proficient directors, Gish happily accepted the offer. Griffith gave her a $50,000 budget and total liberty in the production. He also asked, however, that she supervise the conversion of a recently acquired Long Island estate into a studio, which was far from properly equipped for film production. It proved to be an enormous task, but she completed both it and the film successfully.

The first talkie was directed by Alice Guy, the first color film was produced by Lois Weber, who directed more than 300 films over 10 years. Frances Marion wrote screenplays for the Hollywood Star Mary Pickford and won two Oscars, Dorothy Arzner was the most powerful film director in Hollywood. And what do all of them have in common? They are all women and they have all been forgotten. Incredibly, it also took until 2010 for the first woman, Kathryn Bigelow, to win the Oscar for Best Director. Even if underrepresented women have always played a big part in Hollywood and it is this part of the film history left untold that this documentary sets out to uncover.

Cast

  •                 Sherry Lansing  
  •                 Lillian Gish          
  •                 Margaret Booth

Rest of cast listed alphabetically:

  •                 Ally Acker … Self
  •                 Dorothy Arzner … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Cari Beauchamp … Self
  •                 Alice Guy … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Edith Head … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Anita Loos … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Ida Lupino … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Frances Marion … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 June Mathis … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Mabel Normand … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Lynda Obst … Self
  •                 Mary Pickford … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Robin Swicord … Self
  •                 Virginia Van Upp … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Paula Wagner … Self
  •                 Lois Weber … Self (archive Footage)
  •                 Mae West … Self (archive Footage)

Directed by Clara Kuperberg and Julia Kuperberg

  • Clara Kuperberg … (co-director)
  • Julia Kuperberg … (co-director)

Written by Clara Kuperberg … (writer)

  •  Clara Kuperberg … ()
  •  Julia Kuperberg … (writer)

Produced by

  • Clara Kuperberg … producer
  • Julia Kuperberg … producer
  • Susan Michals … line producer

Cinematography by Peter Krajewski and Mike Nolan

Et la femme créa Hollywood (2016) HDV 720p

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KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview (TV Capture)

Lillian Gish – Mary Martin (Over Easy Camera, New York)

Critics, historians, and scholars are virtually unaminous in their agreement that Griffith’s greatest performer was Lillian Gish. John Barrymore compared her with Bernhardt and Duse. Critics rhapsodized over her “Dresden porcelain” beauty. She started with Griffith in 1912 at the age of sixteen and became his preeminent interpreter in such major works as The Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, Way Down East, and Orphans of the Storm.

KQED – Lillian Gish – Mary Martin 1981 interview – HDV 720p TV Capture

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Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29.97 fps

In 1877, the citizens of Central City organized a fundraising drive for a grand new opera house befitting the gold mining town’s reputation as “the richest square mile on earth.” Many of the town’s residents were Welsh and Cornish miners, who brought with them a rich tradition of music from their homeland. Prominent Denver architect Robert S. Roeschlaub provided an elegant, understated design for the stone structure, and San Francisco artist John C. Massman added elaborate trompe l’oeil murals to the interior.

Her early glory years following the 1878 grand opening were short-lived. When the Central City mines were played out, the Opera House fell into disrepair. Fortunately, a volunteer-driven effort led by Ida Kruse McFarlane, Edna Chappell and Anne Evans led to an extensive restoration of the Opera House in 1932. That summer, the legendary actress Lillian Gish opened the newly restored opera house with Camille, launching an annual tradition of summer festivals in Central City.

Central City Opera House – Now and Then – HDV 720p 29

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Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives

Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality

First lady of the screen, Miss Lillian Gish in an interview filmed in 1978, presented by CBC as an episode in their “Retro-Bites” series.

Lillian Gish, 1978 CBC Archives – TV capture VHS quality

*** Admin note: Featured photo of Lillian Gish was taken in 1978 indeed, but is a still frame from an interview at BBC Television London. The material above has a low VHS resolution (TV capture) thus any still frame will be affected by the poor footage quality. Thank you for your understanding.

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LEADING LADIES – 1976 (Electa Clark) PDF Download

“Humanity marches on into the new and glorious 20th century!” exults a daily paper in its first issue of 1901. “Come, oh century, child of hope!” begins a long poem on page one. Another column trills, “We are 20th century women … with the dower of privilege and responsibility which enriches women in this wonderful era!”

Lillian Gish had a similar effect on millions who saw her in the movies. She was not only talented, she had a unique quality: pure, ethereal, elusive. As if she acted in whispers. As if in her hands, the definite blurred into the indefinite. It was drama critic George Jean Nathan who described her as being “behind a veil of silver chiffon.” He courted Lillian for years, but she eluded marriage.

Horse drawn float declares National American Woman Suffrage Association’s support for Bristow-Mondell amendment
1920s Lillian Gish Actress ‘La Boheme’ Oversized DBW Photo by Kenneth Alexander

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Hollywood: The Golden Era by Jack Spears (1971) PDF Download

In a series of colorful excursions into the golden era of Hollywood, Jack Spears nostalgically recaptures the romance of motion pictures from silents to Cinerama. Hollywood: The Golden Era is a collection of sprightly, intelligent, and entertaining essays on motion picture history and film personalities that will delight every fan.

“Women can be good directors,” Frances Marion said. “Ida Lupino has proved that—but there are too many factions in the studios that believe otherwise.” She regrets that Hollywood quickly forgot the competent movies made before 1920 by such women directors as Lois Weber, Alice Blache, Ida May Park, Elsie Jane Wilson, Mrs. Sidney Drew, and later by Dorothy Arzner. Lillian Gish also tried her hand at directing, and so did several other early actresses—Cleo Ridgely, Grace Cunard, Helen Holmes and Mabel Normand. “It was a wonderful era of happy-go-lucky togetherness,” Miss Marion says.

Jack Spears (1971)

Hollywood: the Golden Era – by Jack Spears (1971)

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Griffith and the Rise of Hollywood – By Paul O’Dell (1970) – PDF Download – excerpts

  • Griffith and the Rise of Hollywood
  • By Paul O’Dell (with the assistance of Anthony Slide)
  • First published in 1970
  • A.S. Barnes & Co. Inc. Castle Books – New York

David Wark Griffith has tended to become in recent years, a figure in cinema history attributed with innovation in film technique; the close-up, the flashback, cross-cutting have all appeared in connection with his name. And so it is that he is now in danger of achieving a widespread reputation merely as technician: an inventor of cinematography. This does justice neither to Griffith himself nor to his work. It may very well be that he did “invent” all these ideas of pictorial presentation – but there is much evidence to suggest that he did not – and if he did not, then he certainly developed their use to startling effect. But these ideas, these techniques were for him only a means towards an end; never the ultimate distinguishing factor of his pictures. Nor was he dependent on these techniques in order to produce a film which stood above all contemporary works. Many of his early pictures contain no close-ups, no flashbacks, no camera movement, no complicated editing techniques, and no innovations. But nevertheless they are indisputably films of high artistic quality. Many post-Intolerance films also contain few, if any, of the “innovations” attributed to Griffith, and yet they are outstanding works nonetheless.

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GONE HOLLYWOOD – By Christopher Finch and Linda Rosenkrantz (1979) PDF Download

Here is a different kind of Hollywood book. Christopher Finch and Linda Rosenkrantz look behind the legends to discover what it was really like to live and work in the movie colony during the Golden Age of the studio system. Gone Hollywood is a book about moguls and mobsters, about parties and politics, barroom brawls and boardroom bargains. Never before has a book dealt so comprehensively with both the surface glitter and the often startling world that lay beneath it, a world that stretched from the stars dancing at the Mocambo to desperate extras living in shanties between jobs. Gone Hollywood looks at the way glamour was created and disseminated, how much the stars earned and how they spent it.

GONE HOLLYWOOD – By Christopher Finch and Linda Rosenkrantz – 1979

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