Last Showing at Opera House for “Hearts of the World” (San Bernardino Sun, 1918)

  • San Bernardino Sun, Volume 48, Number 90, 13 June 1918
  • Last Showing at Opera House for “Hearts of the World”

Robert Harron, the Boy, and Lillian Gish, the Girl, have for this picture done the best work of their respective careers. As the daredevil American of the French troops, Robert Harron wins favor by his unostentatious bravery and Yankee pluck. He is the central figure in numerous hand-to-hand fights that for ferociousness are different from screen encounters heretofore shown.

Lillian Gish and Riobert Harron – Hearts of the World

There has been a very noticeably change in Miss Gish’s style of acting, and this is by far the greatest work she has ever done. Dorothy Gish, as the little disturber, a strolling singer, was applauded- almost every time she appeared on the screen, each time with more enthusiasm.

Dorothy as “The Little Disturber”

Dorothy Gish has been popular heretofore, but this play will make for her a niche in stardom few actresses have been successful in attaining. As the boy’s companions of the French company, Robert Anderson and George Fawcett were easily the other favorites of the male contingent of the big cast, while little Ben Alexander, age about four years, steps forth as an infant prodigy.

Lillian Gish in Hearts of The World

Those who saw “The Clansman” remember George Siegmann’s “Lynch,” and will find him giving a characterization equally as remarkable. His role is that of Von Strohm, the German secret service agent. Other former Griffith players seen to advantage in this most recent success are Josephine Crowell, Kate Bruce and Anna May Walthall.

Hearts of the World – Photo Gallery

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“Way Down East” at Opera House (San Bernardino Sun, 1921)

  • San Bernardino Sun, Volume 48, Number 144, 23 January 1921
  • D.W. Griffith’s “Way Down East”

Opera House, Commencing Tomorrow Night at 8 o’clock

D. W. Griffith’s cinema masterpiece, “Way Down East,” commences a five nights and four matinees engagement tomorrow night, January 24. The evenings commence at 8 o’clock and the matinees at 2 o’clock. Note display announcement for prices.

San Bernardino Sun, Volume 48, Number 144, 23 January 1921

Lillian Gish – In the leading role in D. W. Griffith’s “Way Down East,” has achieved a success that at once places her in the foremost rank of American actresses. Richard Barthelmess, Mrs. Morgan Belmont, a social leader; Creighton Hale, Kate Bruce, Vivia Ogden, Mary Hay, Burr Mcintosh, George Neville, Edgar Nelson, Lowell Sherman, Porter Strong, Florence Short and others are seen. As usual with Griffith production, there in a thematic score played by a large orchestra, and the music is a succession of delightful melodies and impressive compositions, accentuating each situation.

San Bernardino Sun, Volume 48, Number 144, 23 January 1921 advert

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Voice of Lillian Gish Registered in ‘One Romantic Night’ (Eagle Rock Sentinel, 1930)

  • Eagle Rock Sentinel, Volume XXII, Number 50, 6 June 1930
  • Voice of Lillian Gish Registered in ‘One Romantic Night’

No other player In the history of the screen has been associated with more great pictures than Lillian Gish, the famous star whose voice is heard for the first time at the Fox Alexander theater in United Artists “One Romantic Night.” Wherever unprejudiced commentators gather to discuss the artistic and commercial merit of “The Birth of a Nation,” “Intolerance,” “Hearts of the World,” “Orphans of the Storm.” “Broken Blossoms” and ‘‘Way Down East” invariably top the list.  As Alexandra, in United Artists’ dialogue screen adaption of the noted Ferenc Molnar play, ‘The Swan,” Miss Gish believes she has the greatest role of her career. “One Romantic Night” is the star’s first all talking picture. In the notable cast with her are Rod La Rocque, Conrad Nagel, Marie Dressler and O. P. Heggie. This all star supporting cast is further augmented by Albeit Conti, Edgar Norton, Billie Bennett, Phillip De Lacy and Byron Sage. Paul Stein directed the production. The short subjects include a comedy, a novelty and the latest Fox Movietone News.

Never had she looked more lovely. No longer a victim of tyranny, brutality and betrayal, but a Princess, as rare as any out of a fairy tale, with a palace and a rose garden and suitors, with a lilting, perfectly-timed voice, Lillian appeared to have come into her own.

One Romantic Night – The Swan

Director: Paul L. Stein

Writers: Maxwell Anderson (adaptation) Melville Baker (adaptation) 3 May 1930 (USA)

•          Lillian Gish …….… Princess Alexandra

•          Rod La Rocque ………..… Prince Albert

•          Conrad Nagel ….. Dr. Nicholas Haller

•          Marie Dressler …… Princess Beatrice

•          O.P. Heggie …………..… Father Benedict

•          Albert Conti ………………. Count Lutzen

•          Edgar Norton ….. Colonel Wunderlich

•          Billie Bennett … Princess Symphorosa

•          Philippe De Lacy …….… Prince George

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Lillian Gish Stars at New Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz Evening News, 1927)

  • Santa Cruz Evening News, Volume 41, Number 1, 1 November 1927
  • Lillian Gish Stars at New Santa Cruz

Annie Laurie beloved in song and romance through the centuries whose name is one to call up visions of the romantic Highlands and the delicate sentiment of Robert Burns and the ancient bards – Annie Laurie has come to life again. She held big audiences enthralled with her charm, and the charm of the romantic land of her birth; the mighty romance of Scotland, last night at the New Santa Cruz theatre, when “Annie Laurie,” Lillian Gish’s new Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer vehicle, was shown. Lillian Gish literally is Annie Laurie. Those who imagined her as a myth or legend will be amazed at the actual woman for Miss Gish is a faithful portrayer of the real Annie Laurie, who lived centuries ago whose love and whose heroism turned the tide of Scottish history in a real life drama more powerful than any imagined by a scenarist; and whose romance has come down to the world in the song of the ancient bard. Tonight will see the final showings of the greatest starring vehicle of Miss Gish’s brilliant career.

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Advertising “The Children Pay” 1916

San Diego Union and Daily Bee, 7 December 1916

Superba  – The Children Pay

Vital in theme and run or genuine human interest, “The Children Pay,” in which Lillian Gish is starred, will open for a four-day run at the Superba Theatre today. Lillian Gish appears as Millicent Ainsley, the oldest of two sisters, whose parents have neglected them sadly In order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate in a divorce. The two girls grow up in a neglected fashion. Millicent, having an Inventive genius, bending her energy to building various “contraptions” which are unique and interesting, until the courts take up the issue of deciding which parent shall care for them. The eldest girl (Lillian Gish) refuses to choose, after the younger has decided on going to her mother. The problem of granting the custody of the children properly falls to the judge. At this juncture, a new and novel manner of weaving a romance into the plot of a drama it’s introduced by the playwright, and Superba audiences undoubtedly will enjoy the manner in which the plot is worked out. “The Children Pay,” which is a lesson to parents who are not considerate of the welfare of their children, is in the same time a fine starring vehicle for Miss Gish.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Morning Press, Volume 45, Number 96, 24 December 1916

‘The Childrens Pay’ Tomorrow at Mission

Lillian Gish in ‘The Children’ Pay,’ new Triangle-Fine Arts play beginning at the Mission Monday, adds another portrait to her rapidly increasing gallery of screen heroines. She appears as Millicent Ainsley, the eldest of two girls whose parents have negleted them grievously in order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate in a divorce. The children grow up in a small town, apart from both father and mother, under the lax hand of Susan, an indulgent old servant. They are isolated from companions of their own age, and cruel taunts are firing at them by the neighbors. Millicent, who is a decided tomboy and something of an inventive genius, has to fight their battles until Horace Craig, a young law student, takes an interest in the affairs of the girls. Then events take place that threaten for a time to force the girls to look forward to a future and unhappy relationship with their divorced parents. In court, however, things suddenly take an unexpected but highly satisfying turn, and the problems that have given the children so many heartaches are all at once swept away. There is much unaffected originality in the plot of the story, and the underlying idea is one that will interest everyone who has ever been a child, or who has had children. Lillian Gish is said to do very convincing work in the rather difficult role of girl who is both spoiled and saddened by the tragedy of her youth. Violet Wilkie in her Triangle debut as the younger girl, and others in a cast of well known Fine Arts players are Ralph as the father, Loyola O’Connor as the mother, Carl Stockdale as the, judge and Alma Reubens as the step mother.

LILLIAN GISH IN NEW TRIANGLE-FINE ARTS PLAY, “THE CHILDREN PAY.”

San Jose Mercury-news, Volume XCI, Number 173, 20 December 1916

LILLIAN GISH IN “THE CHILDREN PAY” AT THE LIBERTY TODAY.

Lillian Gish in “The children Pay,” new Fine Arts play, adds another portrait to her rapidly increasing gallery of screen heroines at the Liberty today and tomorrow. She appears as Millicent Ainsley, the eldest of two girls whose parents have neglected them grievously In order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate In a divorce. The children grow up in a small town, apart from both father and mother, under the lax hand of Susan, an indulgent old servant. They are Isolated from companions of their own age, and cruel taunts are flung at them by the neighbors. Millicent, who is a decided tomboy and something of an Inventive genius, has to fight their battles until Horace Craig, a young law student, takes an interest In the affairs of the girls. Then events take place that threaten for a time to force the girls to look forward to a future of unhappy relationship with their divorced parents. In court, however, things suddenly take an unexpected but highly satisfying turn, and the problems that have given the children so many heartaches are all at once swept away.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Riverside Daily Press, Volume XXXII, Number 9, 10 January 1917

Amusements

Friday and Saturday Lillian Gish comes in “The Children Pay.” Lillian is seen in the part of a daughter of a wealthy man of affairs who sends the daughter away with a son, after divorcing his wife. In the village she is ostracized and turns her attention to inventing things. Her biggest success is a racing car in which she has lots of fun. It is a drama dealing with the evils of divorce. The racing contraption used in this picture was made for Miss Gish by Barney Oldfield.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Press Democrat, Volume XLIV, Number 1, 3 January 1917

‘The Children Pay’ shown at Clune today

In this unique “go-devil” she tears over the public highways at the risk of life and limb and to the horror of the local Puritans. The strange speed-wagon shown in this play was built especially for Miss Gish at the private machine shop of Barney Oldfield, while the great record-smasher was appearing recently in Los Angeles. After watching the fair Lillian guide the cranky little contrivance, Barney predicted that she would someday retire from the motion picture field long enough to beat him at his own game.

Lillian Gish, Triangle

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

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Advertising “Daphne and the Pirate” 1916

San Pedro Daily News, Volume 13, Number 122, 23 May 1916

Lillian Gish – The Heroine in the Triangle-Fine Arts Romantic Play, “Daphne and the Pirate”

“Daphne and the Pirate”, the feature to be shown at the Globe Theatre today will be doubly interesting, in that the picture was taken in and around the San Pedro Harbor There is an unusually strong cast shown in the production, which features Lillian Gish as star! In this new play Miss Gish has an entirely different role from any in which she has been seen before. She appears as a very lively, mischievous girl of the woods.

Marysville Daily Appeal, Volume CXII, Number 105, 3 May 1916

Daphne and the Pirate

Triangle Double Program at Liberty Will Be Big Feature There Today

A thrilling story of the days when Louisiana was a French colony and girls were sent across the sea to be sold to the colonists for wives is told in “Daphne and the Pirate,” which brings Lillian Gish forward again as a Triangle star at the Liberty theater today and tomorrow. Elliott Dexter, former Broadway leading man and now the husband of Marie Doro, is the hero of the romance and heads a strong Griffith supporting cast which includes Walter Long, Howard Gaye, Lucille Young and Richard Cummings. The costumes of the period lend splendor to the production and there is a realistic fight at sea between a pirate crew and the officers of the king who are conveying a cargo of girls to America. Francois La Tour is game keeper in Green Forest and Daphne is his obstreperous daughter. Philip rides through the forest and meets the lovely girl, with whose charms he is at once smitten. When she snubs him he has her kidnapped and taken to Paris, where she is kept prisoner in a resort where he is known. Later Philip gets into a quarrel with the young prince and is forced to flee. He falls in with a pirate band and is carried aboard their ship. Almost at the same time the resort where Daphne is a prisoner is raided by the authorities and the girls placed on a ship to be sent to Louisiana. The two vessels meet on the high seas. The pirates attack and for a time seem to be successful. Daphne, however, takes command of a gun which is of no use because of lack of men to handle it and with her aid the pirates are themselves made captives. The king’s officer makes them walk the plank after promising Daphne anything in his power except her liberty. When Philip appears, she demands his life as her reward. He thinks that he act is inspired by her infatuation for him, but she is not so easily snared. Finally she is offered to the highest bidder among the Louisiana colonists, but delays her sale by numerous attempts to appear unattractive. Finally she is purchased by Jamie d’Arcy and taken to his cabin to await the arrival of the priest. Philip, who has been barred from bidding for Daphne because of the fact that he is not a property owner, traces the pair and interrupts Jamie in his undesired lovemaking. In a struggle de Mornay overpowers the other and takes the place of the bridegroom when the aged priest finally appears. The newly-weds are well on their way when the discomfited bride-groom-to-be recovers from a blow on the head and finds that his lonely cabin is deserted.

LILLIAN GISH AND LUCILLE YOUNG IN “DAPHNE AND THE A TRIANGLE-FINE ARTS PLAY OF THE OLD AND NEW WORLD * WHEN PIRATES INFESTED THE SEAS.

Los Angeles Herald, Volume XLII, Number 95, 19 February 1916

Los Angeles Herald, Volume XLII, Number 95, 19 February 1916
Santa Cruz Evening News 1916 (Daphne and the Pirate photo)

San Francisco Call, Volume 99, Number 67, 18 March 1916

Daphne and the Pirate at TIVOLI

“Daphne and the Pirate,” which presents Lillian Gish as its star, will be the featured attraction at the Tivoli for the entire week beginning Sunday. This is a story of love and intrigue, giving a thrilling and reliable portrayal of the days when girls were seized in France and sold to the rich men in Louisiana. The happy ending of the picture occurs on the soil of Louisiana, back in the seventeenth century, when that territory was still a French colony, and wives for the pioneers were recruited by the government and shipped across the sea to be sold to the highest bidder. Daphne La Tour (Lillian Gish) is one of these girls. She is kidnapped and placed in a Paris resort. Later the resort is raided and the inmates are placed on a ship bound for Louisiana. This is where the thrilling action of the picture starts, showing a spectacular battle In mid-ocean, in which the pirates are captured and the girl is restored to her lover. Charles Murray in “The Judge,” a screaming farce, will he the comedy offering on the bill. In conjunction with the usual pictures, the Tivoli Travelogue, showing the latest news of the world, will he seen on each change of program.

Marysville Daily Appeal, Volume CXII, Number 106, 4 May 1916

THE LIBERTY

Great Scenes from Early American Days

Historically correct is the story of “Daphne and the Pirate,” the newest Triangle-Fine Arts play which presents the favorite Griffith player, Lillian Gish, as its star. The happy ending of the pictures occurs on the soil of Louisiana back in the seventeenth century, when that territory was still a French colony and wives for the pioneers were recruited by the government and shipped across the sea to be sold to the highest bidder. Daphne La Tour is one of these girls, an unwilling bride-to-be. She owes her predicament to her snubbing of Philip, son of the Due de Mornay. He has kidnapped her and for safe keeping placed her in a Paris resort. Then he gets into a quarrel with the Prince and is forced to flee for his life. Falling into the hands of a, pirate band he is shanghaied aboard their ship and taken to sea. The first sign of booty they see is a ship of the king, bound for Louisiana with a number of girls. Daphne, taken in a raid of the resort where she was confined, is among them. After a battle in which the pirates are made prisoners, she and Philip meet again. She still snubs him, but on Louisiana soil she relents after she has been sold to a lonely colonist, and becomes the wife of the hero who at the last saves her from an unwelcome fate.

Santa Cruz Evening News 1916 (Daphne and the Pirate)

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‘An Innocent Magdalene’ at The Liberty (Marysville Daily Appeal 1916)

  • Marysville Daily Appeal, Volume CXIII, Number 74, 26 September 1916
  • THE LIBERTY

Lillian Gish, the famous and beautiful moving picture star will appear tonight for the last time at the Liberty theater in ‘An Innocent Magdalene.” Mere Man has just has another thrill. He has just had an advance glimpse of “An Innocent Magdalene,” in which Lillian Gish is starring on the Triangle programme, and knows about a whole lot of other new fashions. He watched very carefully, because he wants to tell his wife all about them. “Listen, Penelope,” he says to his wife which he makes swimming motions with his hands; “Lillian had one gown that was some pippin. At a distance, you’d swear it was put on her by a concrete mixer.

An Innocent Magdalene 1916 Lillian Gish l

No matter which way she turns, you can’t see any joints in it. It looks to me as though it was made with one long ribbon wound around her until one end comes under her left ear and other comes just above her right ankle. There are ruffles and ruffles and then some—built, I should judge, on the principle of the Ashokan watershed. Another cuckoo that she wears before the second reel is over, hasn’t a darn bit of decoration on it except a fal-lal —or a fol-de-rol, or some sort of flimsy shawl arrangement with daisies splotched all over it. If it wasn’t for that, I’d say the style of it was the period of the flood because I used to have women dressed like that in my Noah’s Ark when I was a kid: and if it wasn’t for the shoulded-straps on the funny thing, the period would be set still earlier. It is a thrilling story.

An Innocent Magdalene 1916 Lillian Gish k

It is an appealing story and the treatment is nothing if it is not delicate and artistic. Allan Dwan had a splendidly constructed scenario to work from and an intelligent cast to work with. The director himself rose to the occasion and the result is “An Innocent Magdalene,” a picture of rare charm. It is a picture which creates and sustains a real and artistic illusion. Roy Sumerville wrote the scenario from the story by Granville Warwick. Lillian Gish probably never had better opportunities and probably for that very reason never gave such an impressive characteri ation, and she along with Sam de Grasse and Spottiswoode Aitken and others in the cast compels admiration.

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Old-Fashioned Camille to Sin and Die Again – By Boyd Lewis (Oakland Tribune, 1932)

  • Oakland Tribune, Volume 117, Number 108, 16 October 1932
  • Old-Fashioned Camille to Sin and Die Again
  • Lillian Gish. Raymond Hackett, Red Divans in Dumas’ Revival for Blase N. Y.
  • By BOYD LEWIS United Press Staff Correspondent

NEW HAVEN. Conn., Oct. 13. – Delos A. Chappell, wealthy Denver business man who revived Dumas’ “Camille” for the Central City. Colo., Opera House, looked forward today to a Broadway opening despite the snickers with which New Haven greeted its Eastern premier last night. “I am hoping that New York will take Its ‘Camille’ straight,” he told the United Press. “I believe it should be taken not merely as a quaint revival of an outmoded play, but at its face value as a great work of art.”

The Denver millionaire has surrounded Lillian Gish, Raymond Hackett and the other members of the cast with rich trappings, including a priceless music box, ancient red divans, frail French chairs, and a massive grand piano that was carried to Colorado in a covered wagon.

Laura Gilpin (1891-1979); [Camille–Gish, Lillian, and Raymond Hackett] [Made at Chappell Home, Denver]; 1932; Gelatin silver print; Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Ft Worth, Texas; Bequest of the Artist; P1979.140.176

DRAMA EXPERTS THERE.

An audience which included Professor William Lyon Phelps and Professor George Pierce Baker, head of the Yale drama school, sighed audibly as the players enacted their roles with the stilted formality of the play’s period behind old-fashioned bucket -type footlights. Miss Gish’s Dresden-China frailty and studied languor may have endowed Camille with too sweet an innocent a manner for New Haven’s “straight” consumptlon, but this Chappell believes comes from an improper understanding of what sin was in Camille’s day.

Lillian Gish as Camille

SIN COMPARED.

“Sinning. In those days, was not our good old American sinning, the producer said. “Dumas’ Camille was patterned after a girl who was born in the country, brought up in a convent and then muttered from one nobleman to another. Miss Gish’s delicate air of innocence is entirely in keeping with the character.”

And the same applies to Raymond Hackett as Armand. If his postures and speeches seem too stilted for our modern times, it must be remembered that he is acting the role in its original manner.”

The play bill announces that the production is done “in the manner of 1878.”

Camille Cast with R.E. Jones and Lillian Gish in Chappel Garden by Laura Gilpin Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas 1932

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