Advertising “The Children Pay” 1916

San Diego Union and Daily Bee, 7 December 1916

Superba  – The Children Pay

Vital in theme and run or genuine human interest, “The Children Pay,” in which Lillian Gish is starred, will open for a four-day run at the Superba Theatre today. Lillian Gish appears as Millicent Ainsley, the oldest of two sisters, whose parents have neglected them sadly In order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate in a divorce. The two girls grow up in a neglected fashion. Millicent, having an Inventive genius, bending her energy to building various “contraptions” which are unique and interesting, until the courts take up the issue of deciding which parent shall care for them. The eldest girl (Lillian Gish) refuses to choose, after the younger has decided on going to her mother. The problem of granting the custody of the children properly falls to the judge. At this juncture, a new and novel manner of weaving a romance into the plot of a drama it’s introduced by the playwright, and Superba audiences undoubtedly will enjoy the manner in which the plot is worked out. “The Children Pay,” which is a lesson to parents who are not considerate of the welfare of their children, is in the same time a fine starring vehicle for Miss Gish.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Morning Press, Volume 45, Number 96, 24 December 1916

‘The Childrens Pay’ Tomorrow at Mission

Lillian Gish in ‘The Children’ Pay,’ new Triangle-Fine Arts play beginning at the Mission Monday, adds another portrait to her rapidly increasing gallery of screen heroines. She appears as Millicent Ainsley, the eldest of two girls whose parents have negleted them grievously in order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate in a divorce. The children grow up in a small town, apart from both father and mother, under the lax hand of Susan, an indulgent old servant. They are isolated from companions of their own age, and cruel taunts are firing at them by the neighbors. Millicent, who is a decided tomboy and something of an inventive genius, has to fight their battles until Horace Craig, a young law student, takes an interest in the affairs of the girls. Then events take place that threaten for a time to force the girls to look forward to a future and unhappy relationship with their divorced parents. In court, however, things suddenly take an unexpected but highly satisfying turn, and the problems that have given the children so many heartaches are all at once swept away. There is much unaffected originality in the plot of the story, and the underlying idea is one that will interest everyone who has ever been a child, or who has had children. Lillian Gish is said to do very convincing work in the rather difficult role of girl who is both spoiled and saddened by the tragedy of her youth. Violet Wilkie in her Triangle debut as the younger girl, and others in a cast of well known Fine Arts players are Ralph as the father, Loyola O’Connor as the mother, Carl Stockdale as the, judge and Alma Reubens as the step mother.

LILLIAN GISH IN NEW TRIANGLE-FINE ARTS PLAY, “THE CHILDREN PAY.”

San Jose Mercury-news, Volume XCI, Number 173, 20 December 1916

LILLIAN GISH IN “THE CHILDREN PAY” AT THE LIBERTY TODAY.

Lillian Gish in “The children Pay,” new Fine Arts play, adds another portrait to her rapidly increasing gallery of screen heroines at the Liberty today and tomorrow. She appears as Millicent Ainsley, the eldest of two girls whose parents have neglected them grievously In order to pursue their own selfish careers, which finally culminate In a divorce. The children grow up in a small town, apart from both father and mother, under the lax hand of Susan, an indulgent old servant. They are Isolated from companions of their own age, and cruel taunts are flung at them by the neighbors. Millicent, who is a decided tomboy and something of an Inventive genius, has to fight their battles until Horace Craig, a young law student, takes an interest In the affairs of the girls. Then events take place that threaten for a time to force the girls to look forward to a future of unhappy relationship with their divorced parents. In court, however, things suddenly take an unexpected but highly satisfying turn, and the problems that have given the children so many heartaches are all at once swept away.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Riverside Daily Press, Volume XXXII, Number 9, 10 January 1917

Amusements

Friday and Saturday Lillian Gish comes in “The Children Pay.” Lillian is seen in the part of a daughter of a wealthy man of affairs who sends the daughter away with a son, after divorcing his wife. In the village she is ostracized and turns her attention to inventing things. Her biggest success is a racing car in which she has lots of fun. It is a drama dealing with the evils of divorce. The racing contraption used in this picture was made for Miss Gish by Barney Oldfield.

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Press Democrat, Volume XLIV, Number 1, 3 January 1917

‘The Children Pay’ shown at Clune today

In this unique “go-devil” she tears over the public highways at the risk of life and limb and to the horror of the local Puritans. The strange speed-wagon shown in this play was built especially for Miss Gish at the private machine shop of Barney Oldfield, while the great record-smasher was appearing recently in Los Angeles. After watching the fair Lillian guide the cranky little contrivance, Barney predicted that she would someday retire from the motion picture field long enough to beat him at his own game.

Lillian Gish, Triangle

The Children Pay – Lillian Gish

Back to Lillian Gish Home page