Advertising “Daphne and the Pirate” 1916

San Pedro Daily News, Volume 13, Number 122, 23 May 1916

Lillian Gish – The Heroine in the Triangle-Fine Arts Romantic Play, “Daphne and the Pirate”

“Daphne and the Pirate”, the feature to be shown at the Globe Theatre today will be doubly interesting, in that the picture was taken in and around the San Pedro Harbor There is an unusually strong cast shown in the production, which features Lillian Gish as star! In this new play Miss Gish has an entirely different role from any in which she has been seen before. She appears as a very lively, mischievous girl of the woods.

Marysville Daily Appeal, Volume CXII, Number 105, 3 May 1916

Daphne and the Pirate

Triangle Double Program at Liberty Will Be Big Feature There Today

A thrilling story of the days when Louisiana was a French colony and girls were sent across the sea to be sold to the colonists for wives is told in “Daphne and the Pirate,” which brings Lillian Gish forward again as a Triangle star at the Liberty theater today and tomorrow. Elliott Dexter, former Broadway leading man and now the husband of Marie Doro, is the hero of the romance and heads a strong Griffith supporting cast which includes Walter Long, Howard Gaye, Lucille Young and Richard Cummings. The costumes of the period lend splendor to the production and there is a realistic fight at sea between a pirate crew and the officers of the king who are conveying a cargo of girls to America. Francois La Tour is game keeper in Green Forest and Daphne is his obstreperous daughter. Philip rides through the forest and meets the lovely girl, with whose charms he is at once smitten. When she snubs him he has her kidnapped and taken to Paris, where she is kept prisoner in a resort where he is known. Later Philip gets into a quarrel with the young prince and is forced to flee. He falls in with a pirate band and is carried aboard their ship. Almost at the same time the resort where Daphne is a prisoner is raided by the authorities and the girls placed on a ship to be sent to Louisiana. The two vessels meet on the high seas. The pirates attack and for a time seem to be successful. Daphne, however, takes command of a gun which is of no use because of lack of men to handle it and with her aid the pirates are themselves made captives. The king’s officer makes them walk the plank after promising Daphne anything in his power except her liberty. When Philip appears, she demands his life as her reward. He thinks that he act is inspired by her infatuation for him, but she is not so easily snared. Finally she is offered to the highest bidder among the Louisiana colonists, but delays her sale by numerous attempts to appear unattractive. Finally she is purchased by Jamie d’Arcy and taken to his cabin to await the arrival of the priest. Philip, who has been barred from bidding for Daphne because of the fact that he is not a property owner, traces the pair and interrupts Jamie in his undesired lovemaking. In a struggle de Mornay overpowers the other and takes the place of the bridegroom when the aged priest finally appears. The newly-weds are well on their way when the discomfited bride-groom-to-be recovers from a blow on the head and finds that his lonely cabin is deserted.

LILLIAN GISH AND LUCILLE YOUNG IN “DAPHNE AND THE A TRIANGLE-FINE ARTS PLAY OF THE OLD AND NEW WORLD * WHEN PIRATES INFESTED THE SEAS.

Los Angeles Herald, Volume XLII, Number 95, 19 February 1916

Los Angeles Herald, Volume XLII, Number 95, 19 February 1916
Santa Cruz Evening News 1916 (Daphne and the Pirate photo)

San Francisco Call, Volume 99, Number 67, 18 March 1916

Daphne and the Pirate at TIVOLI

“Daphne and the Pirate,” which presents Lillian Gish as its star, will be the featured attraction at the Tivoli for the entire week beginning Sunday. This is a story of love and intrigue, giving a thrilling and reliable portrayal of the days when girls were seized in France and sold to the rich men in Louisiana. The happy ending of the picture occurs on the soil of Louisiana, back in the seventeenth century, when that territory was still a French colony, and wives for the pioneers were recruited by the government and shipped across the sea to be sold to the highest bidder. Daphne La Tour (Lillian Gish) is one of these girls. She is kidnapped and placed in a Paris resort. Later the resort is raided and the inmates are placed on a ship bound for Louisiana. This is where the thrilling action of the picture starts, showing a spectacular battle In mid-ocean, in which the pirates are captured and the girl is restored to her lover. Charles Murray in “The Judge,” a screaming farce, will he the comedy offering on the bill. In conjunction with the usual pictures, the Tivoli Travelogue, showing the latest news of the world, will he seen on each change of program.

Marysville Daily Appeal, Volume CXII, Number 106, 4 May 1916

THE LIBERTY

Great Scenes from Early American Days

Historically correct is the story of “Daphne and the Pirate,” the newest Triangle-Fine Arts play which presents the favorite Griffith player, Lillian Gish, as its star. The happy ending of the pictures occurs on the soil of Louisiana back in the seventeenth century, when that territory was still a French colony and wives for the pioneers were recruited by the government and shipped across the sea to be sold to the highest bidder. Daphne La Tour is one of these girls, an unwilling bride-to-be. She owes her predicament to her snubbing of Philip, son of the Due de Mornay. He has kidnapped her and for safe keeping placed her in a Paris resort. Then he gets into a quarrel with the Prince and is forced to flee for his life. Falling into the hands of a, pirate band he is shanghaied aboard their ship and taken to sea. The first sign of booty they see is a ship of the king, bound for Louisiana with a number of girls. Daphne, taken in a raid of the resort where she was confined, is among them. After a battle in which the pirates are made prisoners, she and Philip meet again. She still snubs him, but on Louisiana soil she relents after she has been sold to a lonely colonist, and becomes the wife of the hero who at the last saves her from an unwelcome fate.

Santa Cruz Evening News 1916 (Daphne and the Pirate)

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