A Limehouse Rose – Current Opinion, July 1919

Broken Blossoms; Current Opinion – July 1919

Mr.Griffith Newest Movie Masterpiece

“Broken Blossoms”, the result of intensive Cultivation in the Field of the Films

Broken Blossoms - Swedish Magazine promo - Lucy Burrows on the pier - Limehouse

A Limehouse Rose

In “Broken Blossoms” Lillian Gish is seen as little Lucy, the Dickensian daughter of a new Bill Sykes. The film is based upon Thomas Burke’s class of “Limehouse Nights” entitled “The Chink and the Child.”

Not quite enough tin foil ... (Broken Blossoms)
Not quite enough tin foil … (Broken Blossoms)

 

Limehouse Rose 1919 1

Limehouse, the home of Lucy and Battling Burrows
Limehouse, the home of Lucy and Battling Burrows

Limehouse Rose 1919 2

Lillian Gish and Richard Barthelmess - Broken Blossoms
Lillian Gish and Richard Barthelmess – Broken Blossoms

Limehouse Rose 1919 3

Lillian Gish and Donald Crisp in Broken Blossoms
Lillian Gish and Donald Crisp in Broken Blossoms

Limehouse Rose 1919 4

Limehouse Rose 1919 5

Lucy Burrows (Lillian Gish)
Lucy Burrows (Lillian Gish)

Limehouse Rose 1919 6

The Room, as for a Princess (Richard Barthelmess and Lillian Gish)
The Room, as for a Princess (Richard Barthelmess and Lillian Gish) – Broken Blossoms

Limehouse Rose 1919 7

Lucy's smile ... (Broken Blossoms)
Lucy’s smile … (Broken Blossoms)

Dying, she gives her

last little smile to

the world that has

been so unkind …

Lillian Gish and Donald Crisp in "Broken Blossoms"
Lillian Gish and Donald Crisp in “Broken Blossoms”

 As a child, I was fascinated by the movies. Maybe I was ten years old when I saw Lillian Gish in D. W. Griffith’s “Broken Blossoms” and I thought she was wonderful. Coming back home from the movie, I remember getting up on a chair looking at myself in the mirror above the fireplace trying with my fingers to make my mouth smile as she did when she was very sad. So moving the faith I had, I thought I would like to do the same thing and be an actress like she was. I didn’t go a lot to movies since we were living in the country. . . .But the one who had made the big impression on me was Lillian Gish in “Broken Blossoms.” Some years ago, I saw her when she made a grand appearance in North Hampton, New Hampshire where my daughter has a house. She was very pleasant, very intelligent and I think she was a wonderful person.

  • From the interview with Annabella in “At the Center of the Frame: Leading Ladies of the Twenties and Thirties” by William M. Drew, Vestal Press, 1999 (Page 108):
Annabella as Violine in Abel Gance's 'Napoleon' (1927)
Annabella as Violine in Abel Gance’s ‘Napoleon’ (1927)

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