Hearts of the World (1918)

D.W. Griffith in the trenches on the western front
D.W. Griffith in the trenches on the western front

D. W. GRIFFITH’S SUPREME TRIUMPH HEARTS OF THE WORLD

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Photo: Lillian Gish in Hearts of The World promotional STAGG L.A.

The sweetest love story ever told A romance of the great war Battle scenes taken on the battle-fields of France (Under the auspices of the British and French War Offices) David Lloyd George, Prime Minister of England

Lillian Gish in Hearts of The World
Lillian Gish in Hearts of The World

“Hearts of the World” was shown for a tryout at Pomona, California, on Monday, March 11, 1918, and during the rest of the week at Clune’s Auditorium, Los Angeles.

Both Lillian and Dorothy had studied and worked very hard for this picture, and it had been obtained at the risk of their mother’s life and their own. It deserved success, and it had it. Lillian, as the heroine of the story, captured and mistreated, gave a beautiful and pathetic presentation of her part. Dorothy, “the Little Disturber,” a strolling singer, had a role suited to her gifts. A lute under her arm, she romped through the war scenes with a jaunty swagger, which, set to music, was irresistible.

Dorothy as "The Little Disturber"
Dorothy as “The Little Disturber”
Dorothy Gish as The Little Disturber in The Hearts of The World
Dorothy Gish as The Little Disturber in The Hearts of The World

 

A London street-girl had provided the original. Lillian discovered her one day, and followed her about, to copy her artistic points. Bobby Harron was the hero-lover of the story—a very good story, on the whole—though it was the ravage and desolation of war that was the picture’s chief value.

Lillian Gish and Robert Harron - The Hearts of The World
Lillian Gish and Robert Harron – The Hearts of The World

On April 4, “Hearts of the World” was presented at the 44th Street Theatre, before an invited audience. When, on the following evening, the theatre was opened to the public, seats sold by speculators brought as high as five and ten dollars. There were long runs everywhere. In Pittsburgh, the picture broke all records for any theatrical attraction in that city.

Dorothy Gish in The Hearts of The World
Dorothy Gish in The Hearts of The World

The writer of these chapters saw the film at this time, and again, with Lillian, in 193 1. A good deal of it was remembered vividly enough. It had been the first World War picture, and it remained one of the best. The trench fighting was terribly realistic. There were scenes taken on the field that were war itself. Always, the action is swift. Toward the end of the picture, where Lillian and Bobby are defending themselves against a German assault, it becomes fairly breathless.

Hearts of The World Program
Hearts of The World Program

Throughout, the picture has a tender quality, in spite of its cruel setting. But there are  exceptions to this, one especially: Lillian in the hands of a German, whipped because she cannot handle a big basket of potatoes.

Lillian in the hands of a German
Lillian in the hands of a German …

“Did the beating hurt?” I asked.

“Terribly. I was padded, but not nearly enough. My back bore the marks for weeks. Mother was fearfully wrought up over it.”

Lillian in the hands of a German - Poster
Lillian in the hands of a German – Poster

She approved the picture, as a whole. Thought it better than many of those made today. She was not far wrong. There was more sincerity of intention—more earnest work. At one place, the heroine, through the shock and agony of war, becomes mentally unhinged. Lillian’s portrayal of the gradual approach of this broken condition was as fascinating as it was sorrowful. (Life and Lillian Gish – 1932)

Lillian Gish and The Little Disturber (Dorothy)
Lillian Gish and The Little Disturber (Dorothy)

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Armistice Day The first crowds gather at Buckingham palace in London for Armistice Day 11 November 1918
The first crowds gather at Buckingham palace in London for Armistice Day 11 November 1918 to commemorate the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I. While this official date to mark the end of the war reflects the ceasefire on the Western Front, hostilities continued in other regions, especially across the former Russian Empire and in parts of the old Ottoman Empire…

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